In August, a group of friends and I went to Andahuaylas. It was the brightest night I’ve ever seen. Full album here.





From the Street by Tom Pfannerstill

Detailed paintings on a carved piece of basswood. His artworks are made based on objects he finds in the street, which he carefully catalogs, noting the time and place of each. These re-created artifacts act as a very personal record of his movements through time and space. 

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Desechos Encontrados wood style!



Cinematographer Hoyte Van Hoytema on capturing Spike Jonze’s ‘Her’ through a non-dystopian lens

Jonze talked a lot at the beginning of pre-production about how he didn’t want the future they were capturing to be a dystopia. He wanted it to be a very comfortable future, and indeed, the film conveys a world of disconnected longing in warm and soothing hues. “We started talking about references, looking at photo books, and it’s kind of a hybrid between being a little bit conceptual and being very theoretical,” Van Hoytema says of the developing visual identity of the film. “But at least half of it is being sort of intuitive and going with your own taste.”
The DP was particularly inspired by the work of Japanese photographer Rinko Kawauchi, whose 6x6 square photographic studies of very trivial things in life had a compelling texture and a nice sort of palette. “She had a lot of influence, but of course it’s always a collection where you’re sort of trying to define some sort of a taste,” he says. “You’re always trying to explain to somebody else what your taste is, and it’s never like, ‘This photographer tells it exactly.’ It’s always a collection of sources that define it.
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When you find out one of your favorite photographers had a huge influence on one of your favorite movies. I am fangirling beyond measure right now.

Cinematographer Hoyte Van Hoytema on capturing Spike Jonze’s ‘Her’ through a non-dystopian lens

Jonze talked a lot at the beginning of pre-production about how he didn’t want the future they were capturing to be a dystopia. He wanted it to be a very comfortable future, and indeed, the film conveys a world of disconnected longing in warm and soothing hues. “We started talking about references, looking at photo books, and it’s kind of a hybrid between being a little bit conceptual and being very theoretical,” Van Hoytema says of the developing visual identity of the film. “But at least half of it is being sort of intuitive and going with your own taste.”

The DP was particularly inspired by the work of Japanese photographer Rinko Kawauchi, whose 6x6 square photographic studies of very trivial things in life had a compelling texture and a nice sort of palette. “She had a lot of influence, but of course it’s always a collection where you’re sort of trying to define some sort of a taste,” he says. “You’re always trying to explain to somebody else what your taste is, and it’s never like, ‘This photographer tells it exactly.’ It’s always a collection of sources that define it.

Read more

When you find out one of your favorite photographers had a huge influence on one of your favorite movies. I am fangirling beyond measure right now.



howlzine:

Chronicles by Cinthya Fung

It started out earlier this year when I ended up with a bunch of pictures on my phone after visiting my dad in Florida after some years. I moved from FL to Peru about 5 years ago so going back was a bit nostalgic. I took pictures of my friends, favorite eating spots, neighborhoods, details, overall quite personal photos. I’m not a big fan of clogging up my instagram, much less facebook, and flickr is just storage to me, yet I had this urge to do something with them. Tumblr has this 3 by 3 photoset layout, I took advantage of it and really liked the outcome. After that I decided not to stop, I kept shooting with this camera that’s always on me - portable, connected, and almost invisible. Became more conscious of the sequence of the photos, their colors, strictly on square format. You can say it became my visual diary, I find it very therapeutic. 

It wasn’t until I showed a teacher these sets of photos I was creating that I decided to consider it a project. She told me… “The emotional relationship we have with our mobile devices and its own characteristics influence the way we use them, thus creating more personal and moving images, post-photographic intimate images. What better tool than a cellphone for portraying our existence, our world.”

Tell us a bit about yourself.
I’m 20 years old, on my last year of photography in Lima, Peru. Kind of aiming for a Master in Digital Arts somewhere else, who knows, but I’m pretty sure I want to travel after graduating. I was born here in Lima and moved to the states when I was little, I think that if it wasn’t because my family decided to come back I probably wouldn’t have studied photography. Maybe it would have taken me a longer time to discover it. I actually got into filming first, because of the birth of my little brother my parents bought a handycam, they weren’t too good with it so eventually I took over. Not a year passed and my older sibling was leaving for college, I promised I was going to keep him updated with everything via videos in YouTube called webisodes. Yes, I love the internet, makes the world seem smaller. I was fourteen then.

How did you get into photography?
I bought my first DSLR when I turned sixteen, started volunteering at my local church taking photos for the youth’s facebook, covering events, camps, etc. I honestly didn’t think much of it until my cousin invited me to Lima Photo which is an annual fair of international galleries specialized in photography, there’s where I saw a whole different side of it. Before all I payed attention to was events, I really liked looking at “music photographers”. As soon as I graduated high school I cancelled my admission to international business and enrolled in a photography school.

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Chronicles →



SONG: UnknownEl Bosque
ARTIST: UnknownNiño Cohete
ALBUM: UnknownAves de Chile
PLAYED: 371 times

Recent discovery from Lima’s music festival.